Unification policies of North and South Korea
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Unification policies of North and South Korea developments and an alternative. by Gun-Yang Park

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Published by UMI in Ann Arbor .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Texas at Austin, 1990.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21230631M

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Unification policy of South and North Korea. Seoul, Korea: Seoul National University Press, [] (OCoLC) Online version: Kim, Hak-chun, Unification policy of South and North Korea. Seoul, Korea: Seoul National University Press, [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Hak-chun Kim. chapter four unification policies of north and south korea in korean war period (j ~ j ) chapter five post-war unification policies of north and south korea: from the armistice agreement to the fall of the rhee government in the south (july ~ april ).   Despite the passage of over forty years since the official end of the civil war in Korea, the north and the south sections of the country remain technically at war. In Korea and Its Futures, Roy Richard Grinker argues that the continued conflict between North and South Korea, and the prospects for peace on the Korean peninsula, must be understood within the broader social and cultural contexts. The s heralded new developments in terms of North Korea's approach to unification - moving away from the tradi-tional approach of aggression and revolution, in order to create a new North-South dynamic. North Korea has virtually aban-doned its "One-Korea" policy and acknowledged South Korea.

Book Description: The unification of North and South Korea is widely considered an unresolved and volatile matter for the global order, but this book argues capital has already unified Korea in a transnational form.   On in a surprising move, the South Korean Ministry of Unification spokesman, Yoh Sang-key, declared that the so-called “May 24 Measures”—sanctions on inter-Korean business introduced in after North Korea’s sinking of the South’s Cheonan corvette—had “lost [their] effect,” and are no longer an “obstacle” to inter.   South Korean President Kim Dae-Jung and his successor Roh Moo-Hyun’s Sunshine Policy meant to provide for a gradual change of North Korea toward the . And with what should it be replaced?Similar to the unification of East and West Germany, merging North and South Korea is likely the only means of achieving stability and lasting peace on the peninsula. However, after decades of a divided existence—with South Korea now thriving as a democracy and North Korea barely subsisting as a Stalinist.

Or whether migration from North Korea towards the south in a reunified Korea has any implications for unemployment or social integration. This is a minor issue in an otherwise very interesting read. O’s The Collapse of North Korea will be of interest to Korea and East Asia specialists, whether from academia or from policy-making.   South Korea can address the unification issue by establishing a legal basis for extending amnesty to most North Korean elites upon unification and for planning to continue the role of many elites in the combined Korean government and/or the combined Korean economy. Similar to the unification of East and West Germany, merging North and South Korea is likely the only means of achieving stability and lasting peace on the peninsula. However, after decades of a divided existence—with South Korea now thriving as a democracy and North Korea barely subsisting as a Stalinist dictatorship—this task will be. There is however, a fundamental difference in the unification of Germany and a possible re-unification of North and South Korea. In Germany, the people of East and West Germany were separated at the end of World War II in a similar fashion to Korea, but the people did not fight each other in a bitter and bloody war as was the case in Korea.